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Global Fund Observer

Newsletter

Issue 210: 25 February 2013

GFO is an independent newsletter about the Global Fund.
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CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE:

1. NEWS: Number of Early and Interim Applicants Under the NFM Could Exceed 60

According to the latest issue of Global Fund News Flash, the Fund will invite between 50 and 60 “interim” applicants to access funding in 2013, through re-programming and top-ups for existing grants. This is in addition to a handful of “early” applicants that will be invited.

2. NEWS: Global Fund Comments on Recent Developments in Grants to Mali

In the latest issue of Global Fund News Flash, the Secretariat discusses the challenges of working in Mali and describes how the Fund has responded.

3. NEWS: OIG Releases Reports on Audits in Three Countries

The Office of the Inspector General has released reports on audits of grants in Central African Republic, Viet Nam and Tajikistan.

4. NEWS: Audit of Grants to Central African Republic Highlights Difficulties of Operating in Challenging Environments

A challenging environment, deficiencies in the capacities of the principal recipients, and measures taken to mitigate risk all contributed to delays in grant implementation in the Central African Republic, the Office of the Inspector General said in an audit report just released.

5. NEWS: Most Reforms Already Implemented, Jaramillo Says in Farewell Letter

The Global Fund has completed 89% of the reforms listed in the Consolidated Transformation Plan, former General Manager Gabriel Jaramillo says in a letter which he sent to a number of people on 18 January, his last day at the Fund. Meanwhile, Board Chair Simon Bland praised Mr Jaramillo's accomplishments.

6. NEWS: Concentrate on Disease Hot Zones, Dybul Says

We are dealing with a series of micro-epidemics, rather than generalised epidemics, Global Fund Executive Director Mark Dybul says. In an interview with The Atlantic, Dr Dybul described a paradigm shift in the approach to international health and development.

7. NEWS: Ecuadorian CCM Must Resubmit Requests for Continued Funding

The Global Fund Board has asked the CCM in Ecuador to resubmit requests for continued funding for two HIV grants and two TB grants.

8. NEWS: Development Assistance for Health Has Stabilised, Report Says

Development assistance for health, which was slightly lower in 2012 than it was in 2010, appears to have stabilised after a period of sharp growth, according to a report prepared by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

9. ANNOUNCEMENT: Applications for Human Rights Reference Group

The Global Fund is soliciting applications for membership on its Human Rights Reference Group.

10. ANNOUNCEMENT: New ICASO and UNDP Publications on Grant Implementation

Two recent publications provide advice and support to help principal recipients implement grants from the Global Fund: one from the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations and the other from United Nations Development Programme.

 
See section near the end of this newsletter listing additional articles available on GFO Live.
 
ARTICLES:

1. NEWS: Number of Early and Interim Applicants Under the NFM Could Exceed 60

The Global Fund expects to invite between 50 and 60 “interim” applicants to access funding in 2013, through re-programming and top-ups for existing grants. This is in addition to the handful of “early” applicants that will able to submit a concept note leading to the creation of a new grant.

This information is contained in the latest issue of Global Fund News Flash, produced by the Secretariat.

As the new funding model (NFM) is phased in, there will be three types of applicants: early, interim and standard. Both early and interim applicants have to meet at least one of the following criteria: (a) are considered by the Global Fund to be significantly underfunded; (b) face service disruption in 2013 and through part of 2014; or (c) are considered by the Global Fund to be “well positioned” for impact.

Early applicants will submit concept notes and go through the full NFM process. Interim applicants will access funds through reprogramming, Phase 2 renewal or grant extensions. “Standard applicants" refers to all other applicants. Standard applicants will have an opportunity to apply when the NFM is fully implemented in 2014. The News Flash said that in 2013 standard applicants “may participate in dialogue geared toward preparing applications for 2014.”

“Throughout this year,” the News Flash said, “the Global Fund and its partners will be asking public and private donors to invest in fighting the three diseases for the period 2014 to 2016. The new funding model will help demonstrate that the Global Fund is investing strategically for maximum sustainable impact, in places where we can make the biggest difference.”

The News Flash said that the Fund expects to launch the NFM "in the coming days."

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 20 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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2. NEWS: Global Fund Comments on Recent Developments in Grants to Mali

The latest issue of Global Fund News Flash from the Secretariat provides additional information on recent developments concerning grants to Mali. GFO reported on 25 January that the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) had been appointed a principal recipient for a Round 8 HIV grant.

Despite the challenges of working in Mali, the News Flash said, the Global Fund has consistently operated there, even after a coup d’état in March 2012.

“The health needs in Mali are considerable,” the News Flash said. "The team of professionals at the Global Fund who work on Mali believe that it is all the more critical to deliver treatment and essential services, and that the difficulties and drastic security conditions caused by civil war are worth bearing. Senior management at the Global Fund supports that approach.”

According to the News Flash, in order to implement the UNDP grant, many special precautions had to be taken, including some reprogramming to adapt to changing conditions on the ground, a “zero-cash” policy and a staggered sequence of delivery of health products.

“The need for such precautions was underscored when mismanagement of funds was discovered in 2010,” the News Flash said. “Instead of abandoning those in Mali who still need treatment, the Global Fund has found ways to persist, by working in close coordination with international organizations, multilaterals, USAID, PMI [US President’s Malaria Initiative], and French civil society, by taking necessary precautions, and by intelligent grant management, which means constantly adjusting to a changing reality. It is paying off.”

According to the News Flash, new funding agreements to expand treatment for malaria and tuberculosis, worth a €52 million, are expected to be finalised and signed by the end of March. “At some point, the fighting in the civil war will diminish. Perhaps the enormous challenges of working in Mali will recede somewhat, and doing development work and disease prevention and treatment will flourish. Regardless, the work remains.”

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 20 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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3. NEWS: OIG Releases Reports on Audits in Three Countries

CAR, Viet Nam and Tajikistan audits were all conducted in 2012

The Office of the Inspector General has issued reports on audits conducted on Global Fund grants in Central African Republic (CAR), Viet Nam and Tajikistan.

Central Africa Republic

The CAR audit, which was conducted in May–July 2012, covered three grants from Rounds 7–9 with a total value of $40.5 million, of which $19.3 million had been disbursed at the time of the audit. The audit included a financial review of the last year (2009) of two Round 4 grants, following the transfer of principal recipient (PR) from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to a national entity.

The audited PRs were the National AIDS Committee and the Ministry of Public Health, Population and Fight Against HIV/AIDS.

The audit identified unbudgeted and unsupported expenditures of $938,014. The OIG said that the Global Fund Secretariat should decide whether some or all of this amount should be recovered.

The audit found that the management and implementation of Global Fund grants in CAR were not satisfactory. Considerable weaknesses were identified in financial management, reporting systems, procurement and supply management, and oversight.

The report on the CAR audit acknowledged the difficulties of operating in a country with an extremely weak infrastructure and a heightened security situation. The OIG said that the audit findings raise questions about trying to practice performance-based funding in such an environment.

(See also next article in this issue.)

Viet Nam

The Viet Nam audit, which was conducted in May–June 2012, covered seven grants from Rounds 6–10 with a total value of $144 million, of which $96 million had been disbursed at the time of the audit. The PR for all of the grants was the Ministry of Health.

The audit concluded that the programmes supported by the Global Fund have generally achieved targets and have been well managed, but that internal controls require some strengthening.

The report said that the audit identified “some issues” that have been referred to the OIG’s Investigation Unit. This means that the OIG uncovered evidence of possible misappropriation of grant funds.

The audit made nine recommendations, one of which it categorised as “very high” priority. It concerned the need to increase the coverage and quality of HIV prevention interventions among most-at-risk populations.

The OIG said that all findings and recommendations from the audit had been accepted by the CCM; and that the CCM, the PR, the LFA and the Global Fund Secretariat had committed to take action to mitigate the risks identified. The audit report listed several actions that had already been implemented.

Tajikistan

The Tajikistan audit, which was conducted in August–September 2012, covered three Round 8 grants and a Round 3 TB rolling continuation channel grant with a combined value of $94.2 million, of which $54.2 million had been disbursed at the time of the audit.

UNDP was the PR for the Round 8 grants; Project HOPE was the PR for the Round 3 grant. The audit focused primarily on the grant for which Project HOPE was the PR. Only about 12% of the expenditures for the UNDP grants were audited; these were expenditures by sub-recipients. (In all audits where the UNDP is a PR, the OIG does not review the UNDP’s direct expenditures; the Global Fund respects the United Nations’ single-audit principle, and so relies instead on audits conducted by UN bodies.)

The audit concluded that major improvements are required in the management and implementation of the Project HOPE grant. The OIG said there were fundamental weaknesses in Project HOPE’s financial and procurement management. The highest priority, the OIG said, was the need to strengthen cash management.

The OIG said that during the audit, two instances of fraud were identified, involving expenditures of $6,800. Both cases related to training expenses and involved cash payments to staff. The OIG said that Project HOPE management acknowledged that these instances of fraud had occurred and stated that they would take remedial action. The cases have been referred to the OIG’s Investigations Unit for follow up.

As it did for the Viet Nam audit, the OIG said that the grants in Tajikistan need to give greater priority to interventions targeting most-at-risk populations.

The OIG said it was concerned about the sustainability of HIV, TB and malaria programming in Tajikistan, given that 85% of the funding for these programmes comes from external donors.

Finally, the OIG said that all of its recommendations had been accepted by the Global Fund Secretariat and relevant stakeholders, and that some mitigating actions had already been implemented.

The reports on the audits in Central African Republic (CAR), Viet Nam and Tajikistan are available on the Global Fund website here. Other OIG audit reports are available on the same site.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 22 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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4. NEWS: Audit of Grants to Central African Republic Highlights Difficulties of Operating in Challenging Environments

Risk mitigation measures contributed to implementation delays

Grant workplans and budgets “no longer achievable”

The report on the audit conducted by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) on grants in the Central African Republic (CAR) paints a picture of principal recipients trying to implement programmes in an extremely challenging environment, where grant funds are exposed to serious risk and the grants are not succeeding very well – partly because of their own deficiencies and partly because of the measures implemented by the Global Fund Secretariat to minimise the risk.

Because little progress has been made implementing programmes, the OIG said, grant work plans and budgets were out of date and no longer achievable.

The audit, which was conducted in May–July 2012, focused primarily on three grants from Rounds 7–9 with a total value of $40.5 million, of which $19.3 million had been disbursed at the time of the audit. The principal recipients (PRs) involved were the National AIDS Committee and the Ministry of Public Health, Population and Fight Against HIV/AIDS.

(See previous article in this issue for information on findings by the OIG of unsupported and unbudgeted expenditures.)

The OIG said that the expectations placed on the CAR for reporting, management and oversight were not realistic. At the time of the audit, the OIG said, necessary support from the Global Fund and implementing partners, particularly for capacity building, had been insufficient.

“The findings and the conclusions of this report raise questions about the suitability of performance-based funding as practiced by the Global Fund in countries hampered by significant infrastructure and capacity challenges,” the OIG said.

The audit report noted that the CAR is a country with an extremely weak infrastructure. There is no electricity in most parts of the country. Less than 3% of the roads are paved. Transportation is unreliable. Mobile phone coverage is limited.

The OIG said that the country is in a permanent state of heightened security. There is armed conflict on the CAR’s borders with Chad, Sudan, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The conflicts contribute to periodic famines which, in turn, create large refugee flows.

The CAR is ranked 179th out of 187 countries in terms of life expectancy (source: UNDP Human Development Report 2011). The OIG said the HIV, TB and malaria programmes are dependent on money from the Global Fund because other donors have either withdrawn their support or are in the process of doing so.

The OIG said that at the time of the audit, the country’s data and reporting systems were not sufficiently reliable to yield accurate and precise information.

According to the OIG, weaknesses in the capacity of the PR contributed to the poor performance of the grants. There were considerable delays in the submission of disbursement requests by the PR. Drug stock-outs were frequent; some antimalarial and anti-TB drugs were out of stock for more than one year.

In order to minimise stock-outs, in 2010 the Global Fund required that its voluntary pooled procurement (VPP) mechanism be used for all drug purchases. However, the OIG said, the CAR did not have sufficient forecasting capacity. Delays in forecasting led to significant delays in procurement. The stockouts continued, the OIG said, “ultimately resulting in the paralysis of program activities.”

Financial and procurement management

The audit revealed significant weaknesses in financial management by the PRs. For example, there were no regular cash reconciliations; the accounting systems were inadequate; and there were no fixed asset registers.

The OIG said that there were a number of irregularities in the procurement process, including no evidence that competitive quotes were requested and no justification provided for not proceeding with the lowest priced bidder.

Oversight

Secretariat

The OIG said that as a result of problems with the grant, the Global Fund Secretariat froze all disbursements in February 2010 and did not initially approve Phase 2 of the Round 7 HIV grant in March 2011. During that period, the OIG said, the Secretariat put in place a number of significant safeguards on oversight and control in an attempt to better manage risks – including strengthening the local fund agent (LFA) team and installing a fiduciary agent to increase the oversight of grant monies. The OIG said that these risk mitigation measures had slowed grant implementation.

In addition, the OIG said, the PRs, the fiduciary agents and the LFA would have benefitted from greater “hands-on” supervision and involvement from the Global Fund team. Between January 2009 and June 2012, the Global Fund Secretariat made only three duty trips to the country; this was not consistent with the risk profile of the country, the OIG said. (The OIG noted that since the audit was completed in June 2012, the Country Team has conducted three missions to the CAR.)

Local fund agent

The OIG observed a number of good practices on the part of the LFA. (The LFA is not named in the audit report; according to the Global Fund website, it is PricewaterhouseCoppers.) Nevertheless, the OIG said, the LFA failed to adopt a proactive approach to reviewing grant activities, such as sharing its findings with the PRs at the end of each visit and advising on innovative ways to tackle the unique challenges in the CAR.

Country coordinating mechanism

The OIG said that there were no defined roles and responsibilities for the country coordinating mechanism (CCM) or its members, and no monitoring of grant outcomes or bottlenecks. Information on grant implementation was not used to anticipate and prevent future problems.

Despite the presence of a conflict of interest (COI) policy, the OIG said, COI declarations are not routinely disclosed or discussed by CCM members. “This has led to a number of actual conflicts of interest including PRs participating in CCM decision-making.”

Recommendations

The OIG recommended, as the highest priority, that the implementers, working with technical partners, revise the work plans of the HIV, TB and malaria grants in order to prioritise life-saving activities and treatment. (The Global Fund is the only donor currently funding the provision of antiretroviral therapy in the CAR.)

In terms of oversight arrangements, the OIG said that the Global Fund Secretariat should ensure that a sound financial control framework is established. “Additional safeguards implemented to further mitigate risks should be accompanied by increased oversight and support so that problems are addressed on a timely basis.”

The OIG recommended that for future grants, the Global Fund consider measures to support capacity-building initiatives before entering into agreements with low-capacity countries.

Actions taken

The OIG noted that a number of actions had already been taken to address the risks that were identified in the audit findings. These included revamping the malaria programme so that it focused on the provision of essential services, with limited coverage and with the active involvement of partners. The revamped programme was within the capacities of the PR, the OIG said.

In addition, emergency disbursements were processed for essential drugs for HIV and malaria to cover needs up to the end of 2012. Further, the structure of the financial and administrative management teams was revised. Finally, one fund portfolio manager and one programme officer were assigned to focus exclusively on the CAR portfolio.

The report on the audits in Central African Republic is available on the Global Fund website here. Other OIG audit reports are available on the same site.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 22 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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5. NEWS: Most Reforms Already Implemented, Jaramillo Says in Farewell Letter

Board Chair commends Mr Jaramillo for his leadership

The Global Fund has completed 89% of the reforms listed in the Consolidated Transformation Plan, and the remaining action items related to the Secretariat are in process, according to former Fund General Manager Gabriel Jaramillo.

Mr Jaramillo made this statement in a letter which he sent to a number of people on 18 January, his last day at the Global Fund. (Mark Dybul started his term as Executive Director on 21 January.) In the letter, Mr Jaramillo described the accomplishments of the Global Fund during the year that he served as General Manager.

“We re-organized the Secretariat, designed a new business model, selected a new Executive Director and positioned the Global Fund to raise an ambitious level of financing in 2013,” Mr Jaramillo said.

In his letter, Mr Jaramillo said that 75% of staff now works in grant management and related areas, up from less than 50% a year ago.

“The introduction of world-class business practices has produced, among other achievements, a more nimble human-resources system, with a greatly streamlined personnel manual,” Mr Jaramillo said.

Other accomplishments mentioned by Mr Jaramillo included reforms to the voluntary pooled procurement mechanism, and the introduction of strategic investment guidance that will improve value-for-money in the Fund’s portfolio.

“In addition,” Mr Jaramillo said, “we brought rigor to our model by working with partners to introduce three Disease Committees, and by allowing our technical partners to participate in our Grant Approval Committee."

Finally, Mr Jaramillo said that collaboration in the field with the Global Fund’s major bilateral partners had improved, and that the results were already visible.

“As Dr Mark Dybul takes over,” Mr Jaramillo concluded, “he inherits a Global Fund that is in excellent shape. It is focused on impeccable grant management, and has put in place the structures to make the difficult strategic choices that produce the highest possible return-on-investment.”

In a separate letter dated 2 February, Board Chair Simon Bland commended Mr Jaramillo for having left the Global Fund in a much stronger position as a result of the reforms Mr Jaramillo implemented. Mr Bland said that the reforms had allowed the Global Fund to deliver more funds to people in need more quickly – with an increase in grant disbursements in 2012 of 26% compared to 2011 – while operating costs fell 10%. "Impeccable grant management was a clear feature of the direction you wanted to take the Fund," Mr Bland said.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 18 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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6. NEWS: Concentrate on Disease Hot Zones, Dybul Says

Mark Dybul, Executive Director of the Global Fund, said in an interview that the world has an "historic opportunity" to contain and end HIV, TB and malaria by focusing on their "hot zones."

The interview was conducted by John-Manuel Andriote. Dr Dybul’s remarks were contained in an article Mr Andriote published in The Atlantic (online) on 13 February.

Dr Dybul said that a better understanding of the epidemiology of the diseases makes it clear there are “micro-epidemics” rather than "generalised" epidemics, even in hard-hit countries. For example, he said, although South Africa has more people living with HIV than any other country in the world, more than half of them live in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces.

"If we can concentrate in these geographies," said Dybul, "we can interrupt new transmissions, getting new transmissions down to very low levels. And we can do it in a rapid time frame, effectively containing the epidemic."

In the interview, Dr Dybul spoke of a new approach to international health and development efforts, which he called a “paradigm shift.” Dr Dybul identified four cornerstones of this shift:

  • a switch by donors from a paternalistic approach to one involving partnerships with countries;
  • a focus on delivering measurable results;
  • a recognition that the traditional country-to-country approach was not effective, and that not only governments, but also civil society, faith-based groups and the private sector need to be involved; and
  • an intolerance of corruption.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 18 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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7. NEWS: Ecuadorian CCM Must Resubmit Requests for Continued Funding

The CCM in Ecuador has been asked to re-submit its requests for continued funding for four Round 9 grants, two each for HIV and TB. The grants are listed in the table below.

Table: Grants in Ecuador for which requests for continued funding must be resubmitted

Disease
Grant number
Principal recipient
HIV
ECU-910-G06-H
Ministry of Public Health
HIV
ECU-910-G07-H
Corporacion Kimirina
TB
ECU-910-G08-T
Ministry of Public Health
TB
ECU-910-G09-T
Corporacion Kimirina

The Secretariat does not publicly divulge its reasons for issuing such notices. However, usually, the Secretariat will issue a re-submission notice if it believes that the programmes covered by the grant are not having sufficient impact – and if it believes that the request for continued funding does not include reprogramming or other changes in implementation arrangements that would address the problem.

In February, the Global Fund Board approved three-month extensions to Phase 1 for all four grants. For the two grants for which the Ministry of Public Health is principal recipient (PR), the extensions were granted without any additional funding.

For the two grants for which Corporacion Kimirina, a civil society organisation, is PR, the extensions were granted with additional funding – $358,638 in the case of the HIV grant, and $123,834 in the case of the TB grant. The Board said that the additional funding was required for these two grants to prevent a disruption of programmatic activities.

Information for this article was taken from the “Report of the Grant Renewals Panel for January 2013,” on file with the author.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 13 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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8. NEWS: Development Assistance for Health Has Stabilised, Report Says

Development assistance for health has stabilised and may not increase for several years. This is one of the conclusions of a report on development assistance for health (DAH) prepared by Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.

The IMHE said that after reaching an historic high in 2010, DAH fell in 2011, but not as sharply as some observers might have expected. “Despite continued macroeconomic stress, the international community continues to respond to the enduring need for health and health system support across the developing world.”

“I think the good news here is that we’re not seeing a decline yet and are maintaining a high level of funding,” said Michael Hanlon, one of the lead authors of the report. “That could change, of course, but I think it’s fair to say we’ve ended the phase of rapid increases in funding and entered a new phase, a maintenance phase.”

The IMHE said that total DAH in 2012 amounted to $28.1 billion; it called this a “preliminary estimate.” This compares to $27.4 billion in 2011 and $28.2 billion in 2010.

The IMHE said that over the past 20 years, DAH has undergone three major phases:

  • The moderate growth phase from 1990 to 2001 in which annualised growth was a stable but modest 5.9%. Over this period, DAH nearly doubled, growing from $5.7 billion in 1990 to $10.8 billion in 2001.
  • The rapid growth phase from 2002 to 2010, in which annualized growth was 11.2%. Over this period, DAH almost tripled, climbing to $28.2 billion in 2010.
  • The no growth phase which started in 2011 as a result of the financial crisis. The amount of DAH in 2012, $28.1 billion, represented a $53 million drop from the 2010 figure.

In the rapid growth phase, spending increased in almost all areas of health, the IMHE said, but was largely driven by investments in HIV, TB and malaria. The launch of the Global Fund and the GAVI Alliance propelled DAH growth higher. Support for NGOs also rose rapidly.

The IMHE said that in 2012, DAH channeled through bilateral agencies decreased 4.4%. Among the six largest bilateral channels of DAH, only the spending by the UK and Australia increased from 2011 to 2012, at rates of 2.3% and 8.1%, respectively.

GAVI continued to have very strong rates of growth, the IMHE reported. In 2012, expenditure by GAVI reached an estimated $1.76 billion in 2012, a 41.9% increase over 2011. In comparison, expenditures from the Global Fund decreased slightly from 2010 to 2012 (from $3.29 billion to $3.07 billion).

The IMHE said that many of the countries with the highest disease burdens do not receive the most DAH. Of the top 20 countries with the highest disability-adjusted life years, only 12 are among the top 20 recipients of DAH. The IMHE noted that seven of the remaining eight countries are classified as middle income by the World Bank.

The title of the IMHE report is “Financing Global Health 2012: The End of the Golden Age?” Some of the information for this article was taken from a post on the Humanosphere website.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 14 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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9. ANNOUNCEMENT: Applications for Human Rights Reference Group

The Global Fund is soliciting applications for membership on its Human Rights Reference Group. The Reference Group will advise the Secretariat of the Global Fund on all matters relating to human rights and HIV, TB and malaria.

The Reference Group will consist of 5–8 experts on HIV, TB, malaria and human rights from diverse fields, backgrounds and approaches. The Global Fund wants to ensure that composition of the Reference Group reflects gender balance and geographical diversity.

Members of the Reference Group will not be compensated for their service but travel and per diems related to meetings of the group will be covered. The Global Fund estimates that membership on the Reference Group will involved a time commitment of 10-15 hours per month.

According to a post by Meg Davis, Senior Specialist for Human Rights, Global Fund Secretariat, on 20 February on the listserv of the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition, interested persons should send a one-to-two page cover letter summarising their qualifications, plus a one-to-two page resume, and the names and contact details for two references to: gfhumanrights@gmail.com. Deadline for applications is 1 March, and the first teleconference will probably take place the week of 11 March.

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 22 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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10. ANNOUNCEMENT: New ICASO and UNDP Publications on Grant Implementation

The International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO) has released a report which analyses the technical support needs of civil society PRs. Meanwhile, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has published a capacity development toolkit for national entities implementing HIV, TB and malaria programmes.

The intended audience of the ICASO report includes stakeholders involved in Global Fund processes, technical support providers and other partners. The report was compiled from interviews with civil society organisations, which were conducted between May and July 2010.

Some of the issues discussed in the report include the minimum size for CSOs in terms of staff and finances, the role of principal recipients (PRs), and the special considerations for civil society organisations (CSOs) becoming PRs, such as the ability to carry out big projects. The report also describes how the decision to seek a nomination to be a PR is made and how proposals are developed.

Information on the technical needs of CSOs in regard to the new funding model (NFM) is not included in the ICASO report since the NFM had not been developed when the interviews were conducted.

The UNDP toolkit provides guidance on how to implement Global Fund grants while managing the risks by training local staff and building the financial and managerial systems necessary to adequately respond to the three diseases.

The ICASO report is entitled “Technical Support Needs of Indigenous Civil Society PRs.” The full name of the UNDP toolkit is “The Capacity Development Toolkit to Strengthen National Entities to Implement National Responses for HIV & AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.”

[This article was first posted on GFO Live on 20 February 2013.]

To comment on this article, click here.

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AVAILABLE ON GFO LIVE:
 
The following articles have been posted on GFO Live on the Aidspan website. Click on an article heading to view the article. These articles may or may not be reproduced in GFO Newsletter.

NEWS : UNDP Appointed PR for a Round 8 HIV Grant in Mali to Replace Government Body

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has been appointed the principal recipient for phase two of the Round 8 HIV grant in Mali, replacing the National AIDS Council, a government body which was found to have misappropriated money by the Office of Inspector General in 2011.

NEWS : Influence of Community Sector on CCMs Is Affected by External Factors, Report Says

A new report from the Civil Society Action Team says that the ability of the community sector to influence decisions made by country coordinating mechanisms is to some extent determined by national contexts and by structures that exist outside of the CCM.

NEWS : OIG Identifies Irregularities in Cambodia Malaria Grants

The Global Fund has taken steps to safeguard its investments in Cambodia after uncovering evidence of “serious financial wrongdoing” in its malaria grants.

__________________________________________________________

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